medicating our children

I’m back from a very productive weekend in Nantucket, which I spent writing with an informal group of women, all of whom were working on various projects: a psychiatrist, a psychologist, an ob/gyn,… Continue reading

Syria: fashionable dictator?

I love fashion, and am fascinated by politics, especially the democracy movements in the Arab world, but I’d prefer it if Vogue magazine stopped trying to be my source for all things both… Continue reading

seductive subversion: women pop artists

If you live around these parts (the greater Boston area), you only have a few days left to head over to Tufts University and catch a truly amazing (and free!) exhibit of mostly… Continue reading

what’s in a major? liberal arts vs. engineering

Happy Monday! The start of another work-week has me thinking about what gets us employed in jobs we actually like (and maybe even love): our education. Our course of study, and the degrees… Continue reading

what would Japan do?

Japan’s disaster puts everything in perspective, doesn’t it? In spite of incredible hardships and overwhelming loss, the Japanese people have kept their collective cultural spirit intact, even days after the disaster, and even… Continue reading

Mike Huckabee & single moms

To Mike Huckabee and your fellow hypocritical brethren: you’ve really gone and done it this time. You’ve taken trolling for birther votes to a new low. In case you were trapped under a… Continue reading

the peculiar and fantastic art of Edward Gorey

“I just kind of conjured them up out of my subconscious and put them in order of ascending peculiarity.” —Edward Gorey …and so starts the “Elegant Enigmas: the art of Edward Gorey” exhibit… Continue reading

Italy, no country for women

Italy is one of my favorite places on earth, but not because of the way it treats women. In the late 1980s I spent my days as a student studying in Florence armed… Continue reading

Egypt, Mother of the World

Throughout the Middle East, Egypt is known as “The Mother of the World”: the 6,500-year-old-and-counting birthplace of modern civilization and culture. Throughout Egypt, and across the Middle East, women—the mothers of the world—are… Continue reading

Ira Glass & why storytelling matters, part 2

This weekend, in between bouts of cross country skiing and running errands, I saw Ira Glass, the creator of NPR’s This American Life speak at Harvard’s chapel-like Sanders Theatre. Called “the nation’s storyteller”… Continue reading